Celebrating Earth Day: The Conservation Case for Nature Play

Celebrating Earth Day: The Conservation Case for Nature Play

We can all agree that our earth needs some loving. Our oceans are increasingly polluted, deforestation is destroying valuable habitats around the world, and the list of endangered species continues to grow. Caring for our planet is a big task -- one that requires all hands on deck -- but it's becoming harder and harder to find people who are up for the job. 

As scientist Stephen Jay Gould said, "we will not fight to save what we do not love."

If we want to raise a generation of children who will care for the Earth, we have to start by helping them to love it. Love grows from a sense of connection and familiarity. But in today's busy, high-tech world, fewer people than ever are slowing down to appreciate the beauty and wonder that our Earth has to offer. 

The sad fact is that the average American child can recognize 1,000 corporate logos, but identify fewer than 10 plants and animals native to their own region. This isn't surprising, given that children today spend half as much time outside as they did twenty years ago. 

The risk here is that if children's innate attraction to the natural world is not fostered, they may develop biophobia, an aversion to nature that can manifest as a lack of concern for the environment. 

The good news is that there's an easy solution to this problem. Research shows that frequent, unstructured experiences in nature are the most common influence on the development of life-long conservation values. 

So yes, sending your kid off to play outdoors really can change the world. It's a simple step, but with the stakes so high, it's a crucial one. 

With that in mind, we've designed our Wonderkin monthly subscription boxes to make it easier than ever for you to get your kids outdoors and connected to nature, no matter where you live or how busy your schedule is. Sign up today, and get $5 off your first box with promo code FIRSTBOX5. 

Happy adventuring!

 

Emma Huvos